Coach Danny Ford and Coach Pat Dye trading cattle in 1992

It was December 1992 and I was a freshman at Clemson. I was hired to work in athletics as a student. My job was to help the video services department capture football practice so the coaches could grade and prepare for each game. At the time, the video services department worked mainly for football, our office was in the old ticket office inside Jervey Athletics. In 1992, Clemson Football went 5-6 and video services used that December to begin helping Clemson Basketball with video analysis. We had lots of time on our hands since we did not go to a bowl. My boss at the time was John Ballenger (we all called him JB). He called me after class and asked if I had my still camera in my dorm room. He drove to pick me up and we headed to Coach Ford’s farm in Pendleton. I grew up with Coach Ford and his family, went to Daniel High School with his daughters Jennifer and Ashley. We all went to church together, so I knew it was a treat to go to Coach Ford’s farm. Mrs. Ford had called JB to see if we could come take a special picture. When I arrived at Coach Ford’s farm, there was a gentleman chatting with him; it was my understanding they were trading cattle. As we walked up Coach Pat Dye introduced himself and I was in amazement. Not too many times do you get to meet such a legend from Auburn Football. I know Coach Ford played at Alabama but was interesting to see that he had such a great relationship with Coach Dye. Coach Ford asked if I could take a picture of the two of them. I have been looking for this picture for the last five years. This was taken on a Canon T50 SLR camera, which was 35mm. At the time, I did not save the negatives from this image, so I was hoping one day this image would reemerge. While moving my office, I found this image in a pile of old images that used to be in the safety deposit box. As I was thumbing through the images, I found this one. This is one of my favorite images I have captured. I have so much respect for Coach Ford, not because he was a great football coach; but because he is a good man. I hope one day I will be able to get both Coach Ford and Coach Dye to autograph this image and maybe let me take another one! #GoTigers #Canon

It was December 1992 and I was a freshman at Clemson. I was hired to work in athletics as a student. My job was to help the video services department capture football practice so the coaches could grade and prepare for each game. At the time, the video services department worked mainly for football, our office was in the old ticket office inside Jervey Athletics.

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The art of the interview is bigger than the technical expertise!

The art of the interview is bigger than the technical expertise of capturing the perfect interview. Creating the shot, finding a great background, proper lighting outside with the impact of the fall season sunlight, proper mic selection blocking out surrounding noises, framing that provides space for the interview subject to move inside the frame…these are the important technical considerations of a great interview. But the real art begins even before you press record…it begins the moment the interview subject arrives and you shake hands. It is the art of fruitful conversation, intriguing discovery, careful manipulation, asking the right questions at the right moment in time; creating the silent space after a question forcing the interview subject to fill the silent void…these are just a few attributes to mention. But the canvas is carefully painted when trust between the interviewer and the interview subject beings sharping…trust that you will carefully craft each question where each moment that is captured is protected to display the complete context of the conversation, but provide a narrative that matches the interview disposition. I love it…I love the interview…I love the conversation, the exploration, the delivery of that one question you are dying to ask…but you ask when they are ready to share. It is finding that moment when they really want to share that one piece of information you are patiently waiting to ask …yet, you don’t ask until they are so ready share…they are digging their heals sitting on the edge of their seats just to say it. #priceless #interview #canon #c100 #bringit

The art of the interview is bigger than the technical expertise of capturing the perfect interview. Creating the shot, finding a great background, proper lighting outside with the impact of the fall season sunlight, proper mic selection blocking out surrounding noises, framing that provides space for the interview subject to move inside the frame…these are the important technical considerations of a great interview. But the real art begins even before you press record…it begins the moment the interview subject arrives and you shake hands.

It is the art of fruitful conversation, intriguing discovery, careful manipulation, asking the right questions at the right moment in time; creating the silent space after a question forcing the interview subject to fill the silent void…these are just a few attributes to mention. But the canvas is carefully painted when trust between the interviewer and the interview subject beings sharping…trust that you will carefully craft each question where each moment that is captured is protected to display the complete context of the conversation, but provide a narrative that matches the interview disposition.

I love it…I love the interview…I love the conversation, the exploration, the delivery of that one question you are dying to ask…but you ask when they are ready to share. It is finding that moment when they really want to share that one piece of information you are patiently waiting to ask …yet, you don’t ask until they are so ready share…they are digging their heals sitting on the edge of their seats just to say it.
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