[Intersection Podcast] Episode 003 - Leveraging the Domestic Violence Story

Hosted by Bobby Rettew

Becky Callaham is the executive director of Safe Harbor, a domestic violence organization that serves the upstate of South Carolina. Safe Harbor’s mission is to provide a continuum of services for victims of domestic violence and their children, as well as to eliminate the cultural acceptance of domestic violence through prevention, education and a coordinated community response.

I met Becky early 2011 as Safe Harbor began embarking on a new journey; to tell their story and the many stories of domestic violence survivors. In that same year of 2011, South Carolina had the highest rate of women murdered by men in the US, more than double the national average. In 2012, it had the second highest rate of women murdered by men; 71% of women killed by men in South Carolina were killed with a gun. On a single day in 2014, South Carolina domestic violence programs served 390 victims and  domestic violence hotlines receive approximately 21,000 calls, an average of close to 15 calls every minute.

It was time to tell Safe Harbor’s story; not only survivor stories but also stories showcasing how Safe Harbor is truly impacting their community. There were interesting intersection emerging time and time again. What are the ethics associated with leveraging stories of domestic violence survivors as a means to fundraise; specifically in-order to expand services in the upstate of South Carolina. A conversation we continually examined and discussed during our time working together, a conversation that encouraged us to continue capturing and telling more and more stories.

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Bobby Rettew:
Intersection is brought to you by Social Health Institute. Exploring new and innovative ways for hospitals and healthcare organizations to develop and enhance their social media and digital marketing strategies. Learn more at socialhealthinstitute.com.

Becky Callaham:
The word that I would use now, instead of thinking about as a protective thing, now that I know more, is more of a responsibility.

Bobby Rettew:
Welcome to Intersection. I’m Bobby Rettew, storyteller.

Becky Callaham:
I am Becky Callaham, I’m the executive director of Safe Harbor and I lead an organization that provides prevention, intervention, and advocacy services for victims of domestic violence and their children, in the upstate of South Carolina.

Bobby Rettew:
Safe Harbor’s mission is to provide a continuum of services for victims of domestic violence and their children, as well as to eliminate the cultural acceptance of domestic violence through prevention, education, and a coordinated community response. I met Becky early 2011 as Safe Harbor began embarking on a new journey to tell their story and the many stories of domestic violence survivors. In that same year of 2011, South Carolina had the highest rate of women murdered by men in the US. More than double the national average. In 2012 it had the second highest rate of women murdered by men. 71% of women killed by men in South Carolina were killed with a gun. On a single day in 2014 South Carolina domestic violence programs served 390 victims and domestic violence hotlines received approximately 21,000 calls. An average of close to 15 calls every minute. It was time to tell Safe Harbor’s story.

Bobby Rettew:
Not only survivor stories, but also stories showcasing how Safe Harbor is truly impacting their community. There were interesting intersections emerging time and time again. What are the ethics associated with leveraging stories of domestic violence survivors as a means to fundraise? Specifically in order to expand services in the upstate of South Carolina. A conversation we continually examine and discuss during our time working together. A conversation that encouraged us to continue capturing and telling more and more stories.
Bobby Rettew: So Becky, I’ve been thinking about how you and I stated working together. Well your team, this team at Safe Harbor. And we have been doing this for a long time. What, about 10 years?

Becky Callaham:
Yeah.

Bobby Rettew:
Isn’t that kind of crazy?

Becky Callaham:
I think when we first met your wife was pregnant for the first time. So yeah, it’s been a while. Well probably way before that.

Bobby Rettew:
Could be.

Becky Callaham:
Yeah.

Bobby Rettew:
So, a little background, so basically for many years I have been working with Safe Harbor to help them tell their story through video and many other digital mediums. And Safe Harbor is located here in the upstate of South Carolina. Tell us a little bit about what you do in the upstate? It’s in very basic things that you help people with.

Becky Callaham:
Yeah. We have emergency shelter for victims of domestic violence and their children. We have three of them altogether. And in each location … We have 34 beds in Greenville, 20 beds in Anderson, and 16 beds in Oconee. It’s your basic, if somebody had to leave their home in the middle night due to domestic violence, they come into our shelter. We provide services for them, advocacy, safety planning, everything that they would need for probably a couple of months, and help them move beyond the abuse.

Becky Callaham:
We also have counseling for victims of domestic violence who just are anywhere from, I think I might need to talk to somebody about my relationship, all the way to, I need to leave and I need to develop a plan to do that, to, I’ve left and now I’m trying to figure out how to move forward with my life and I’m having a difficult time. We have transitional housing for folks who have left the abuse and we assist them with a little bit more safety net moving beyond and to help them get their footing in the word of independent living, and finding resources for jobs and daycare, and whatever comes with that, since they’re on their own for first time.

Becky Callaham:
And then on the other ends of our intervention services, we have a pretty significant prevention program. Where we have educators going to our middle schools and in our high schools and help youth understand how to have healthy relationships. And teach them those basic hard skills of what healthy relationships look like, and how to navigate that, and tips, and those kind of things. But also some of those soft skills of, the dance of what a healthy relationship looks like. What is our responsibility in the relationship? What is the other person’s responsibility? What does respect look like?

Becky Callaham:
And these youth are able to work together, kind of grapple with some of these issues that they may not have ever had conversations with. Which is interesting too, because you have these kids who are growing up where they have really great role models and parents who have respect for each other. And then you have kids who are coming from situations where they’ve had very chaotic lives, and they have horrible models for respect. And they can have these conversations together. And they’re having these conversations, it just that there’s not necessarily a facilitator to help kind of guide it, to where it’s a healthy end.

Becky Callaham:
Some of the conversations that they’re having, we know now, and the ideals and some of the things that youth are encouraging each other and using models of social media and role models that are really bending toward disrespect. And so some of these kids who have great role models are starting to look at, wait, well, you know what, this is kind of how it is now. This is how we act now. And maybe what my parents were doing and how they’ve been telling me is not necessarily true. And this kind of how …

Becky Callaham:
So to really have another voice in the room to kind of help them grapple with that and identify really what a respectful relationship looks like is our effort to start moving the needle in South Carolina, in our little corner of South Carolina, toward less domestic violence in the future and more respect in the future. And then on the other end of our prevention intervention is our advocacy and outreach in our communities. Really trying to strategically look at where influencers are in our communities. Such as our faith communities. Our systems who work with people who are in situations where domestic violence might occur.

Becky Callaham:
Which … department of social services, law enforcement, our judicial system, other helping agencies, and understanding that they come into contact with families. And how can we really work together to understand the prevalence of domestic violence altogether and have a common definition of it. And what are we going to do together to create a culture which is our mission statement. To create a culture where all people feel safe and respected in their relationships. And I think all of our systems or those people who come into contact … our community at large can agree that we would all like to have this. And it’s our responsibility together to do that, but how are we going to do that? So these are the things that we’re doing at Safe Harbor.

Bobby Rettew:
Which is an interesting conversation because I think … I want to dive back real quick because the mission five or six years ago was the same, but you’ve done so much in that amount of time to look at it so differently. Because you think about it, the early times when we started to work together, it was educating just people about domestic violence. This is what it is, and now it’s a bigger piece of the pie. And it’s kind of come at the same time of this big national conversation. How important has outreach been to telling the Safe Harbor story to the community at large, in order to really move the needle?

Becky Callaham:
You know, I think with any kind of social ill, if you will, you can talk about statistics all day long and talk about facts all day long, but the outreach that has done the most … had the most impact have been individual stories about people who’ve experienced it and understand that it’s not them, you know, which in domestic violence is really, really tricky.

Bobby Rettew:
Why is it tricky?

Becky Callaham:
Because it’s just such a hard thing to talk about, and address, and look at, and recognize it could be in your family. It could be your boss, your … the person sitting next to you in the Sunday school class, or your child’s teacher. And how are you going to address that? That’s tricky. So to understand that it really does have a face, and that it truly does affect every single one of those people. And it’s just icky. It’s just … We had somebody who was interested in potentially helping us raise some money, and she said, you know what, the two hardest things organizations to raise money for are issues related to mental health, and issues related to domestic violence. It’s just tough.

Bobby Rettew:
So let’s think about that for a second. When we first started working together, and we started thinking about what stories are we going to tell. We had lots of discussions about the what story are we going to tell? So I’d like to go back to some early times and thinking through where did we start? Was it just defining what it is and putting a face to it? And how did we begin that in your mind? I know how we did, but what … I kind of remember some of that.

Becky Callaham:
Yeah. I remember where we were, when we were first having these conversations. We were at Coffee Underground, and you were asking some really hard questions and a lot of hard follow up questions and I’d started … my hand started sweating a little bit, because you were getting in to some of the-

Bobby Rettew:
What questions? Do you remember?

Becky Callaham:
I don’t remember. But I just remember they weren’t the normal you know, what does a survivor of domestic violence look like? You were getting in … You were going in between the facts trying to get to the individual feelings. And so I remember feeling at this point, the confidentiality and the protection of victims of domestic violence that I had worked with for at that point maybe 10 years … yeah 10 years, was so prevalent in my mind that I did not want to … I didn’t want to disrespect anybody’s story or pimp them out to leverage an issue about domestic violence on the heels, or on the back of and individuals personal, horrible situation where their lives had been splayed open and make it worse on them. Does that make sense?

Bobby Rettew:
And I think we started seeing some of that in the very early stages with many of the victims. Because they were so willing to talk about it, but we were so worried about the ramifications of sharing those inner details.

Becky Callaham:
Exactly.

Bobby Rettew:
Let’s talk about those ramifications. And let’s talk about it in two different lenses. One is, we live in South Carolina, the upstate of South Carolina, where there is lots of different populations, lots of different socioeconomic backgrounds, and there’s also a massive stigma associated to domestic violence. It doesn’t happen to me. I’m a white person that goes to church and does good things and we just don’t talk about that publicly. Do you think that was one of the factors we had to work through? Is to figure out who were the people we’re going to ask, and how do we not enable the stigma in the community by just displaying any domestic violence story?

Becky Callaham:
Right. So, because … And I guess that’s the struggle too. Because domestic violence is so complex and to use somebody’s story and have them be the poster child for a very, very complex and demeaning, horrible situation in their life is tough, is really, really tough. And to try to figure out, alright, you know having that person tell their story and then understanding that whoever’s going to be listening to that, what are they going to take from that, and understand, oh, this is what domestic violence looks like. We’re using a story to educate. And so I felt a … We at Safe Harbor felt a responsibility to say, alright, now that there’s this … Are we responsible for what the listener is going to be taking from that? And then creating more stigma. First of all, honestly, the most important thing that we are concerned about is the safety of the individual telling the story.

Bobby Rettew:
Why so?

Becky Callaham:
Because domestic violence is just such a dangerous thing. If somebody is telling their story and if they’re in a situation where their abuser knows that they are talking about them, and that can make it more dangerous for them, or their children. And that’s one of the many reasons why folks just rarely talk about it to begin with. It’s like, you know, I can’t even tell my story because this person’s still in the community. And I just need to quietly just move on with my life. At that point, I guess it felt like we were protecting them.

Bobby Rettew:
Right, well and let’s even back it up a little bit to. Is that … If I understand correctly and I’ve gotten to know Safe Harbor and domestic violence correctly, it’s hard to get women to leave. To say, I admit that somethings going on in my house, and now I’m going to leave. I’m going to get out of this situation. So there’s a whole process that they have gone through to get to the point to actually leave the bad situation. And then they come into Safe Harbor services. They spend time at the shelter, they get their lives in a place where they can feel comfortable to find a new safe environment. And then they’ve gone through this process and like, oh by the way, can you tell your story? I mean, that process just to leave has probably taken maybe five or six or 15 or 20 years just to get out of there. And then we want to leverage it?

Becky Callaham:
Yeah, exactly.

Bobby Rettew:
That’s a huge conversation to have.

Becky Callaham:
Well and so if you’re thinking about other situations where you have people telling their stories, to leverage a cause for instance. The issue of domestic violence is just so personal. It happens with the person you love the most, and it happens … From the stories that I had been honored to even know when I’ve been working with survivors. These are the most demeaning, hard, vile … Like I said, they’re every bit of their vulnerabilities were splayed open and annihilated by somebody who they loved the most. And who wants to relive that?

Bobby Rettew:
Right. Well let’s go back to the first thing we ever created, which was the Safe Harbor story. And it was created for fundraising.

Becky Callaham:
Yeah, exactly.

Bobby Rettew:
It’s sole purpose was to go out and to have people at community events, tell them the story, and then make an ask, and some engagement. And so a couple things kind of came out of that. Number one is we had a lot of discussion, do we feel comfortable asking certain people to tell their story so we can go fundraise? That was hard. And we had a lot of debate over it.

Becky Callaham:
We felt more comfortable in this place where, if we did just basic … Fundraising and outreach are two different things. And so an outreach story is where you go and you may have somebody’s story and you talk about an issue and you just put it out there. That’s kind of what we were doing prior to you coming on board, in a limited way. And we were … We felt like that was as much as we could do. Because the more outreach … And still true. The more outreach you’re doing in the community, people are aware of your organization, they’re aware of your cause and if they intrinsically feel like, that they want to give to an organization, then they’re going to help support your organization. And we had already reaped some benefits of that. And that felt more comfortable to us, rather than using somebody’s story. Like I said, it felt like pimping somebody out in order to get money for an organization to have money for additional services. So it felt-

Bobby Rettew:
It felt awkward.

Becky Callaham:
It was very awkward.

Bobby Rettew:
It was awkward at first. And I think we had a lot of really interesting debates about who we should pick to tell their story. The one thing that I have to admit that I’ve never told you this, is I actually wondered if I was the right person to do this.

Becky Callaham:
Really?

Bobby Rettew:
Mainly because, why is a male telling the story of a domestic violence victim in an arena that … Can a male truly tell that story? And I grappled with that a lot. And I was … I even worried in some of those early discussions that I pushed too far because I’m a male. You know, and it was a tough balance to walk away from. I remember leaving those discussions doing a lot of, really, some soul searching. Making sure I was the right person.

Becky Callaham:
Yeah.

Bobby Rettew:
Now a quick break to give a quick shout out to the network that supports Intersection, Touchpoint Media. A collection of podcasts dedicated to discussions on all things healthcare. Including digital marketing and online patient engagement strategies, CIO and technology strategies, the challenges of the online physician, the power of the E-patient, and most importantly the power of storytelling. To learn more, go to touchpoint.health. That is touchpoint.health. Let’s rejoin the show.

Bobby Rettew:
What were some of the first feedback that you got once we started showing some of those first stories?

Becky Callaham:
From?

Bobby Rettew:
From the community at large? You know, obviously the individuals that were in the story, but you know, from the people that were potential donors, outreach in general? What was some of the feedback that you got when you started pushing that stuff?

Becky Callaham:
Well, it was overwhelmingly positive from everybody. Overwhelmingly positive. And so the people that we asked and were willing to tell their story, felt very empowered, they said by sharing their story. And being able to tell the story of this was then and this is now, felt very empowering is the only word I guess I can come up with. And they felt like-

Bobby Rettew:
It was kind of therapy for them.

Becky Callaham:
It was, it was. I mean they’d already … Most of them had already gone through our therapy with us. But it was very therapeutic to be able to sit down and talk about it and say wow, there was this, and here is where things are now. Yeah, this is great. And I think that the whole idea of perhaps maybe, my story might help somebody else, was also a very positive experience for survivors.

Bobby Rettew:
And it’s really brave of them if you think about it. So let’s paint the picture real quick.

Becky Callaham:
Oh yeah.

Bobby Rettew:
You know, this isn’t walking in and just talking. This is, we’ve agreed to sit down and have us tell your story. We’re going to bring a big cameral, a bunch of lights. We’re going to hang a microphone over top of you. And we’re going to shine all this stuff. We’re going to ask very tough questions and oh, by the way, we want you to be completely transparent, and be emotional. With all this production stuff around you. And then it was the moment that … It was almost like they just turned on. And didn’t have to ask questions. It was one question and boom, it was just like where do we shut them off?

Becky Callaham:
Yeah, that’s why I can continue to do this work every day, honestly. It is because of the bravery and the strength of being able to know that you’ve got … I mean I just can’t imagine. Like you said that they were going trough this every single day, and describing this. And the whole idea of, this was your life and these terrible, just things that can cause you to … It’s crazy making. You know to cause you to really question everything that you know about the world. And make you feel so horrible. And the fact that the resilience part of it … I’m not going to just put it behind me and go on about my life. I’m going to tell strangers about this. You know what’s interesting too, and again that’s where I recognize it’s not my responsibility to be protective.

Becky Callaham:
That most of them would say either subtly or after the fact, or even in the time of their interview process. If this is a fundraising thing … Actually that was the thing. It was like we’re okay to do it for outreach but we don’t want our survivors to ask for money. And we had one survivor who said, I need you to invest in services like Safe Harbor, because of my story. And because of the fact that there are other people who are experiencing this. And you need to know my story, so you can understand that services like Safe Harbor need the resources to help those people who are not coming forward quite yet, who will be the next person who is that child in the shelter, I think is what she said.

Bobby Rettew:
What is your reaction to the MeToo campaign? And how did it align with y’all’s efforts to do the outreach? And how did it help you in any way rethink or reshape where you wanted to go?

Becky Callaham:
Yeah. It certainly did give validation to just the overall concept of what violence against women overall is about. And it’s about power and control. And so the whole MeToo movement specifically was mostly about sexual harassment, sexual assault. But the bravery of folks who are feeling more comfortable now, slowly but surely publicly telling stories about their experiences. And the reaction of … And I think that’s hopeful to me, the reaction of many people in our community that are saying “Wow. Oh, we had no idea it was happening. How was this so secret?” And then those of us who’ve been working in this field were saying, “It’s secret because of the power and control.” So it certainly did give validation. But it is quite limited to an easier … Maybe I’m biased, an easier … No, it’s hard. And I don’t want to put any … I don’t want to make it a competition, but discussing what’s going on in your home on a regular day to day basis with the person you love. We still haven’t gotten that far.

Bobby Rettew:
It’s hard.

Becky Callaham:
To be able to uncover the complexities, and how vicious and prevalent domestic violence is. You know, we’re certainly befitting from having these conversations about power and control in workplaces, and in relationships. So it’s still so tough and we’ve still got a long way to go.

Bobby Rettew:
But wouldn’t you say with that, that this whole notion that, y’all made a pretty interesting shift? We have done all this work to empower women to tell stories, because we need to empower women. Oh by the way, we probably need to start thinking about the men. And the call to men and … Talk about that shift, and why we had to start engaging men’s stories?

Becky Callaham:
That is what’s so hopeful to me. Is that when I went into this work 18 years ago, the questions that we were fielding were, what are the signs and symptoms of somebody who’s a victim of abuse? How do you pick her out? Why didn’t she leave? If she leaves, why doesn’t she stay gone? What did she do in order … What was here role in this? And all of these questions. And these questions were asked to us as an organization. Media would come to us and it was after a victim had been killed. So you’re looking at the onus of all the responsibility is on the victim. And situations where a victim does call for help, a lot of the questions that were being asked were, what did you do? And then a lot of the responsibility-

Bobby Rettew:
Asking the women like she … What did you do to make this happen? What was-

Becky Callaham:
It wasn’t that obviously but it was very subtle.

Bobby Rettew:
It was put on the woman.

Becky Callaham:
It was absolutely. In any other situation if you think about any other … Barring addiction maybe. In any other situation we are not every going to put the onus of a problem on the victim of the situation. Except for domestic violence.

Bobby Rettew:
And it was very apparent. Right. But it was very apparent that it’s like you did something, you wore a short skirt, you were mean, you spoke up, you didn’t do the dishes, you didn’t do the … It was you, you, you, you, woman, woman.

Becky Callaham:
You were nagging, nagging, nagging. So and in all of our systems, so there’s where we were. So, we have moved forward and had more complex conversations.

Bobby Rettew:
Let’s talk about that. What is … You started something called the man upstate?

Becky Callaham:
Yeah.

Bobby Rettew:
Talk about that and what was that shift to make that happen?

Becky Callaham:
Nationwide, there were some folks who were saying, “Gosh, the people who are talking about domestic violence are only women.” And women are leading these organizations. Survivors are talking about their stories and … What’s the percentage of domestic violence where women are the victims? Eighty-five, eighty-seven something like, percent, where victims are women. If the problem is that women are victims and the reality is that most guys are good guys. Why aren’t we getting them to the table to help them, help us work together in addressing the issue of domestic violence? And of course at that point it was like, eureka. And that was probably what, 10 years ago? Nine years, eight years ago? And so yeah, ManUpstate was our initiative to really get men to the table to say, alright, what is the responsibility of men to hold each other accountable for providing respect in relationships?

Bobby Rettew:
And Tony Porter in a call to men really helped us think about that didn’t he?

Becky Callaham:
He did.

Bobby Rettew:
I kind of want to go to some of his first, and he talks about the man box. And I remember the man box conversation, and he talks about the percentages. And then he looks in the room and he says, where are all the good men? Why are you not standing up and calling down the guy that’s doing the cat call?

Becky Callaham:
Yeah.

Bobby Rettew:
And then from that we started telling stories and finding the good men in the community and letting them tell their story. When we started capturing those stories of good men, what did that do to you? What did that make you think and start looking at? When you started hearing those stories coming from them?

Becky Callaham:
You know, once again, once again, I had underestimated the capacity for somebody else to be engaged and care about and want to tell a story from their point of view together. And that we aren’t alone in this. Doing domestic violence work, a lot of times those of us who’ve been in human service work, let’s just be honest. A lot of us feel like we’re alone in this, and that we have to carry this torch. And so until we really give other people an opportunity to come alongside us, including survivors who want to … Some of them want to be part of changing things. And men who were … they wanted to know what to do to help.

Becky Callaham:
And helping us to figure out what does that look like? And so, yeah, I underestimated and how do we come to our communities in a way that we can identify where their roles are to help us not just respond. And I think that’s the thing. We typically looked at, how do you respond to issues of domestic violence? But more than that, deeper than that. How are we creating this … Calling each other out. Men calling each other out when there’s cat calling. How do we know that that’s preventing-

Bobby Rettew:
That’s something new.

Becky Callaham:
Yeah, exactly. How do we know that that’s preventing something from happening in the future? How do we know that … So that is-

Bobby Rettew:
But it had to happen. Because then we saw what’s his name from the NFL in the video where inside the elevator … And it put on a national stage-

Becky Callaham:
Ray Rice.

Bobby Rettew:
Ray Rice. And that was the first time the nation had seen someone swing and hit someone. And I remember being in this office right after that happened. And I was taken back by it.

Becky Callaham:
Why?

Bobby Rettew:
Because I’d never seen that before. I’d never seen in real person, someone slugging and hitting another woman like that. In that way, that manner. And the weird dynamic that came out of that.

Becky Callaham:
What hit me the most was … I can imagine that. I haven’t … Actually I don’t think I’ve ever seen it myself. But that wasn’t … What I think told the bigger story to me in that video, was him dragging her out. That was the-

Bobby Rettew:
Not the hitting, but it was the dragging.

Becky Callaham:
The hitting was horrible, I mean it was horrible. I mean we know that, but the complete ownership of her unconscious body. And him just pulling her out like she was not even human was the story that it told me.

Bobby Rettew:
And the commitment that men have to be a part of the conversation.

Becky Callaham:
Yeah.

Bobby Rettew:
Like did it almost say, we’ve got to dive even more to this?

Becky Callaham:
Yeah.

Bobby Rettew:
And what do you think was the feedback from the men that said, I want to start being a part of this? Like I know it’s hard to galvanize men, because men want action. They want steps to do things, and it’s hard for us to figure it out. But that movement was good, but still it’s a challenging movement.

Becky Callaham:
It’s tough. It’s tough to get some traction. It’s been tough for us to get traction. While we know that it’s the most important thing and the conversations we’re having are more complex, and more holding the abuser accountable at this point. And having guys be a part of that. I think what we’re seeing, just in our history, is that we have a lot of movement, a lot of momentum there for a while. And it got really tough. And so we just kind of … It’s been stalled for a minute. And that’s how things are too, I mean domestic violence is really not the sexy topic that it was about three or four years ago in South Carolina. So there are other things that have been taking its place. But it continues to go on just as much.

Bobby Rettew:
And the numbers are still there.

Becky Callaham:
The numbers are still there.

Bobby Rettew:
I mean what’s South Carolina in relation to the nations still?

Becky Callaham:
We’re number five in the nation now.

Bobby Rettew:
What we were a few years ago?

Becky Callaham:
We were number one, number two, number three. But still we’re number five in the nation of women killed by men. And at any given year, our movement could be back to number one. I still feel a enormous responsibility and honor of the fact that there are people who trust our organization and the people in this organization to hold with them the most horrible things that have ever happened in their lives. And the confusion of it happening with the person that they love the most. But I think that the word that we were using before … And maybe we weren’t even using that word. But the word that I would us now instead of thinking about it as a protective thing. Now that I know more, is more of a responsibility.

Becky Callaham:
And I still feel a enormous responsibility. But it’s not protection anymore. Because especially the very first interviews that you did, I recognize that if somebody wants, and feels comfortable telling their story, then that’s up to … That’s their story. And it’s really not … It’s very patronizing of me to feel like I am protecting them from something that I’m fearing that is going to hurt them or make them feel uncomfortable as opposed to giving them a choice and allowing them to choose for themselves. But also holding the responsibility as knowing that I am going to be in the end responsible for any kind of content or any kind of negative repercussions that might occur as we tell their story. And to be very respectful just maintain the safety and the emotional safety as well as their actual physical safety. Keep that in the forefront of our minds.

Bobby Rettew:
Becky Callaham. Thank you.

Becky Callaham:
Thanks Bobby.

Bobby Rettew:
Thank you for joining us. We hope you enjoyed the conversation and exploration. Most importantly, the many intersections inside the world of storytelling. Intersection is powered by Touchpoint Media Network, podcasts dedicated to discussions on all things healthcare. Go to touchpoint.health for many other podcast exploring digital marketing and online patient engagement strategies, CIO, technology strategies, the challenges of the online physician, the power of the e-patient and most importantly, the power of storytelling. To learn more, go to touchpoint.health, that is touchpoint.health. Have a good day.

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